Ch. 9 of Labor and Employment Law focuses on internal union conduct and highlights the following laws governing such conduct: Section 9.2: “Duty of Fair…

Ch. 9 of Labor and Employment Law focuses on internal union conduct and highlights the following laws governing such conduct:

Section 9.2: “Duty of Fair Representation (DFR)”

Section 9.7: “Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA)”

Section 9.9: “Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO)”

Write a 6- to 8-page response to the following questions:

If you could rewrite the laws governing internal union conduct, what would you add to existing law? What would you delete or abolish? Why?

Sample Solution
scherzo-like theme in the string section but later in the movement the winds interrupt with a raucous theme reminiscent of the siege and battle. The movement starts with a string trio and expands outward from there. Stylistically, it sounds like a neo-classical dance, scherzo, and a lyric intermezzo. Initially, a light, lilting theme is introduced by the strings. The classical elements appear as clear phrases and cadences at first, but the dance seems almost broken as various other instruments seem to be playing their random tunes. The meter shifts quite frequently and the number of accidentals involved makes the dance sound much sadder in some places and grotesque in others. One could interpret this as the aftermath of the battle as it paints an image of almost confusion and shell shock. Gradually the movement manages to organize itself into a very haunting waltz just after rehearsal 82 with a solo melody provided by the clarinet. As other instruments enter, the meter continues to shift, throwing off the feel of the waltz. Each part seems to be almost clashing with one another making the entrances increasingly dissonant before giving way to another fanfare reminiscent of the culmination point of the first movement. One could interpret this as the aftermath of the battle as it paints an image of almost confusion and shell shock. Gradually the movement manages to organize itself into a very haunting waltz just after rehearsal 82 with a solo melody provided by the clarinet. As other instruments enter, the meter continues to shift, throwing off the feel of the waltz. Each part seems to be almost clashing with one another making the entrances increasingly dissonant before giving way to another fanfare reminiscent of the culmination point of the first movement. Shostakovich used the Seventh Symphony to portray images of both the events occurring around the World War II siege of Leningrad and his view of the Stalin regime. The Seventh Symphony was highly regarded in the Soviet Union as a statement of the suffering and deaths attributed to Nazis and the resilience of its citizens. The first performances were greeted with ovations and tears as the country mourned the many losses received at the hands of their oppressors. Alexei Tolstoy recognized the unconstrained outpouring of emotion the symphony evoked. He wrote an admirable review of the work in the Soviet paper, Pravda. In his evaluation of the symphony, Tolstoy projected the acceptable views of nationalism and patriotism espoused by Stalin. The Seventh Symphony became part of a propaganda campaign as it was played throughout the Soviet Union. The staging of the Leningrad performance at the Astoria Hotel was on August 9, 1942, this was the day that Hitler had selected to celebrate the capitulation of Leningrad if it had occurred. The performance was transmitted through the city and out to the Nazis on the front lines in order to discourage the troops. In the United States, the symphony was also part of the war propaganda to sell the alliance between the Soviet Union and the West in fighting the Nazis as a united front. The first performance in the United States was in July 1942. The performance was by the NBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Toscanini. Overall, the Seventh Symphony was performed 62 times from 1942 -1943 symphony season. In conclusion, Shostakovich adapted his musical style to the requirements of the Stalin regime. In doing so, he incorporated nationalistic and patriotic themes in his music that were familiar to the Russian people, and reflected social realism. The Fifth Symphony was his rebirth as an acceptable Soviet musician after his previous opera was criticized by the Communist leadership. While expressing the approved musical styles, the Fifth Symphony can also be interpreted as having a hidden satirical meaning present in the music. The Seventh Symphony came to represent the siege of Leningrad and could instill patriotic feelings in the country. However, Shostakovich could also have been commenting on the struggl>GET ANSWER Let’s block ads! (Why?)

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