Explain, using the theory of optimization and a graph, the circumstances under which a waste site could be made “too clean.” You may either describe…

Explain, using the theory of optimization and a graph, the circumstances under which a waste site could be made “too clean.” You may either describe your graph in detail or post a photo of your graph for the class to see.250 words U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer’s book Breaking the Vicious Circle: Toward Effective Risk Regulation examines government’s role in controlling and managing the health risks society faces from exposure to environmental pollution. One major problem examined in the book is the cleanup of hazardous waste sites. Justice Breyer was extremely critical of policymakers who wish to see waste sites 100 percent clean.

Explain, using the theory of optimization and a graph, the circumstances under which a waste site could be made “too clean.” You may either describe your graph in detail or post a photo of your graph for the class to see.

Sample Solution
ppears to suggest that the numbers put out by the times may have been exaggerated. Following the first reform act came the Chartist movement which first emerged in 1836 and increased in activity up to 1848. Chartism was very much a movement for people of the working class and aimed to grant them political rights. Chartism had six main aims which they campaigned for. Firstly Chartists wanted a vote for all men aged twenty one who were not being punished for a crime and who were mentally stable. Chartists also wanted to introduce the the secret ballot, this was to protect the voter and allow to vote freely. Chartists also wanted payment of MPs so they would be able to take time away from their occupations to represent the nation. Annual parliamentary elections and electoral districts of becoming equal size were also things that Chartists were campaigning for. Chartism is a prime example of popular pressure as it was a movement which had had gained a large following in the hope of achieving parliamentary reform. In total the movement put forward three petitions in 1839, 1842 and 1848. Each petition as rejected but it was said the final petition of 1848 was said to have had six million signatures. Whether this number is correct or exaggerated is unimportant because we cannot deny that by late 1840s Chartism had grown in size and popularity. When it came to delivering the petition there was supposed to be a mass meeting on Kennington Common in London. Parliament expected a large turnout so sent 8,000 soldiers to try and control the situation. They were greeted with only 20,000 Chartists as many did not attend due the rain that day. This was regarded as a massive failure and the petition getting rejected led to the downfall of Chartism. Although the Chartist movement came to an end without achieving any of their aims they did successfully build pressure and create unrest. Going forward to the later reforms acts of 1867 and 1884 many chartist ideas were included which creates the impression that the movement influenced later change. Thus making it more successful than it appeared. With regards to the 2nd Reform Act, there were big extensions of the vote, in particular it gave the vote to large numbers of town workers. There is disagreement among historians a>GET ANSWER Let’s block ads! (Why?)

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